History

Scientific discoveries and milestones.

1992

The Swedish mutation, which leads to early development of Alzheimer’s disease, was discovered in a Swedish family by Professor Lars Lannfelt

2000

US patent application filed on the discovery of the Arctic mutation, and its propensity to form amyloid-beta oligomers/protofibrils a target for drug intervention

2001

The discovery of the Arctic mutation was published. The Arctic mutation leads to increased production of amyloid-beta oligomers/protofibrils and early development of Alzheimer’s disease. This gave an insight into a new target for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease: amyloid-beta oligomers/protofibrils

2003

BioArctic Neuroscience AB was founded by Lars Lannfelt and Pär Gellerfors

2004

Karolinska Innovation AB invested in BioArctic (the asset was later transferred to Karolinska Development AB)

Concerning a transgenic mouse model (APPArcSwe), BioArctic filed two important patent applications concerning a transgenic mouse model and a concept patent for antibody treatment of Alzheimer’s disease

2005

The drug candidate mAb158 (precursor to BAN2401) was isolated at Uppsala University, in Sweden

BioArctic and Eisai entered into a research collaboration concerning a disease modifying treatment for Alzheimer’s disease

BioArctic started research on Parkinson’s disease in collaboration with Uppsala University

Uppsala University Holding AB invested in BioArctic

2006

BioArctic was located in own premises in Stockholm, in Sweden

2007

BioArctic and Eisai entered into a license agreement concerning the antibody BAN2401 as a disease modifying treatment of Alzheimer’s disease as a result of the research collaboration agreement of 2005

The second US patent for Alzheimer’s disease was granted

BioArctic filed a patent application concerning the antibody BAN2401

2008

BioArctic and Eisai entered into a second research collaboration concerning a back-up antibody to BAN2401

BioArctic and Swenora Biotech AB entered into a license agreement concerning Swenora’s technology for the treatment of complete Spinal Cord Injuries

BioArctic started the development of a treatment for complete Spinal Cord Injury (SC0806) in collaboration with the department of Neurosurgery at the Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden

2010

The clinical development of BAN2401 was started and SC0806 was granted orphan drug status in the EU

2011

SC0806 was granted orphan drug status in the US

2012

BioArctic received a grant from Vinnova for the clinical development of SC0806

BioArctic signed an extension of the ongoing research collaboration with Eisai on immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s disease

2013

BioArctic’s partner Eisai started a clinical Phase 2b study in the US concerning the drug candidate BAN2401 and the clinical development of BAN2401 was started in Japan

2014

The clinical development of BAN2401 in Alzheimer’s disease was started in Europe

BioArctic received a MEUR 6.4 grant from the EU’s research and development program Horizon 2020 (Grant Agreement No. 643853) as co-financing of a clinical study concerning the treatment of Complete Spinal Cord Injury

BioArctic’s partner Eisai entered into an agreement with Biogen concerning the continued development and commercialization of BAN2401 in Alzheimer’s disease

2015

BioArctic and Eisai entered into a license agreement concerning BAN2401 Back-up, a follow-up project to BAN2401, and a third research collaboration agreement concerning a new disease modifying treatment for Alzheimer’s disease

BioArctic’s research program on Parkinson’s disease received grants from Swedish Vinnova and the EU’s research and development program Horizon2020 (Grant Agreement No. 697790)

BioArctic started a clinical study concerning the treatment of Complete Spinal Cord Injury, SC0806

2016

The company’s name was changed from BioArctic Neuroscience AB to BioArctic AB

BioArctic entered into a collaboration agreement with AbbVie concerning research on Parkinson’s disease

2017

The patent for BAN2401 backup was granted in the US

BioArctic received two grants from Swedish Vinnova for the company’s work with the quality management system and the commercial potential of antibody-based PET imaging